Bird of prey poisoned with banned pesticide

A bird of prey found dead in the Highlands was poisoned with a banned pesticide, police have said.

The red kite was found in the Ruthven area of the Monadhliath mountains, south of Inverness, in October.

Newly-released results from analysis show it had traces of an illegal pesticide in its body.

Police and RSPB Scotland carried out a search on Tuesday around the area where the bird was found. No other poisoned animals were detected.

Highlands and Islands wildlife crime liaison officer Daniel Sutherland said: "This incident is sadly another example of where a bird of prey has been killed through ingestion of an illegally-held poison.

"I strongly urge anyone within the local and wider community to come forward with details on any information about this incident."

Earlier this year, a white-tailed sea eagle died from pesticide poisoning in Aberdeenshire.

A police investigation into the deaths of 12 red kites and four buzzards in the Highlands in 2014 ended three years later without anyone being charged.

The birds found in the Conon Bridge area were killed by pesticides banned under UK-wide legislation.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-55332657

 

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