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Breeding for Profit in an Overpopulated World Article from Peta Website

 

Breeders, pet shops, and puppy mills fuel the companion-animal overpopulation crisis by bringing more animals into a world that’s already bursting at the seams with unwanted ones. Breeders run the gamut from “professionals”, who continuously produce “pedigree” puppies and kittens in hopes of winning show titles and making money by selling the animals’ offspring, to “backyard breeders”, who mate animals indiscriminately to make a quick buck by selling puppies or kittens.

Pet Shops

Pet shops acquire most of the puppies they sell from puppy mills. The puppies are typically taken from their mothers at an early age, packed into crates, loaded onto a truck or plane and shipped hundreds of miles to dealers and pet stores, often travelling for days without adequate food, water or ventilation. Pet shops sell animals to anyone who can pay, often sending them home with unprepared, incompetent or even abusive guardians.

This – combined with the fact that puppies and kittens from pet stores are notoriously difficult to socialise and train because they’ve been deprived of regular, loving human contact – means that many animals who are purchased from pet stores later end up in animal shelters after people grow tired of them.

https://www.peta.org.uk/issues/animals-not-abuse/pet-trade/

Puppy mills are commercial breeding facilities which mass produce dogs solely for profit, often forsaking all else, including proper care, nutrition, and socialization. Approximately 90% of all puppies sold in pet shops are the product of these unscrupulous breeders who indiscriminately breed dogs without regard for the animals’ feelings, well-being, temperament, or health.

Puppy mill operators treat their dogs as mere commodities and keep them in the most appallingly substandard conditions imaginable.

The dogs are commonly housed in makeshift shelters where they are subjected to scorching sun and bitter cold without protection from wind, rain, or snow.

Cages are often stacked several rows high, with the waste from the upper animals dropping on those below. The overcrowded and filthy cages are commonly infested with parasites. One puppy mill visitor reported seeing moldy food in the animals’ dishes and maggots on the animals’ skin.

Puppy mill dogs often receive little, if any, veterinary care and are fed inadequate and poor quality food. Commonly, female dogs are bred at every heat cycle, usually beginning at six months of age. Once their weak bodies can no longer generate profit for the breeder, they are considered a drain on the mill and are destroyed-usually by five years of age. Puppies are removed from their sickly and malnourished mothers at an early age and shipped to pet shops across the country.

https://isaronline.org/programs/dog-and-cat-overpopulation/dog-overpopulation-and-puppy-mills/

Ugly truth about pet shops

Pet shops treat puppies, kittens, birds, hamsters, mice, rabbits, and other animals as if they were fashion accessories and sell them to anyone who plunks down a credit card. Selling animals denies homes to homeless and unwanted animals who await adoption in animal shelters.

Most animals sold in pet stores come from mass-breeding facilities called puppy mills, where they are denied socialization, exercise, and veterinary care. The puppies are typically taken from their mothers at an early age, packed into crates, and trucked or flown hundreds of miles to brokers and then to pet stores, often without adequate food, water, or ventilation. Some puppies don’t survive the grueling journey.

Conditions at many pet stores are inadequate at best; at worst, they are outright abusive. Puppies are often kept in wire-bottomed cages; small animals such as mice, hamsters, gerbils, and rats are often crammed en masse into small, filthy, crowded cages; fish who were meant to swim freely in their ocean, lake, or river homes are reduced to circling the same few cubic inches of water in tanks that are often dirty and crowded; and exotic birds are typically kept in tiny cages, which prevents them from satisfying their natural needs to fly and socialize with others of their own species.

Deprived of regular, loving human contact, puppies and kittens bought at pet stores are notoriously difficult to socialize and train. Compounded by the fact that, unlike good animal shelters, most pet stores don’t bother to screen potential animal adopters, this means that many animals who are purchased on a whim by unprepared people end up at animal shelters.

https://www.peta.org/issues/animal-companion-issues/pet-trade/pet-shops/

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Pet Shops

Pet shops acquire most of the puppies they sell from puppy mills. The puppies are typically taken from their mothers at an early age, packed into crates, loaded onto a truck or plane and shipped hundreds of miles to dealers and pet stores, often travelling for days without adequate food, water or ventilation. Pet shops sell animals to anyone who can pay, often sending them home with unprepared, incompetent or even abusive guardians.

This – combined with the fact that puppies and kittens from pet stores are notoriously difficult to socialise and train because they’ve been deprived of regular, loving human contact – means that many animals who are purchased from pet stores later end up in animal shelters after people grow tired of them.

https://www.peta.org.uk/issues/animals-not-abuse/pet-trade/

many more puppıes ın cages

Misleading Statements Deceive Consumers

In a video released by Companion Animal Protection Society (CAPS), the owner of Pet’s Delight in southern Pasadena told an undercover investigator that their puppies didn’t come from puppy mills. Upon researching the names of the breeders, however, it was revealed that the puppies came from large puppy mills, and more than one of the breeders used by the store had received violations from the USDA. Pet’s Delight remained open after the investigation, but a pet store ordinance that became effective in July 2017 required them to stop selling puppies and kittens from commercial breeding facilities.

In 2008, an eight-month long investigation conducted by the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) looked at the records for 76 locations of Petland, a large chain with locations throughout the U.S. Upon review of the USDA inspection reports for the breeders used by each location, investigators “found that more than 60 percent of the reports listed serious violations of basic animal care regulations.” HSUS also visited several of the breeding facilities used by the stores and witnessed animals “living in filthy, barren cages reeking of urine, with inadequate care and socialization.” While the investigation shed light on the issues associated with Petland, it appears that all locations were allowed to remain in operation.

Barkworks, a pet store chain in California, was also found to be dishonest when undercover investigators from CAPS asked questions about the origin of the animals. They were told the puppies came from small breeders, when in fact, they came from some of the worst puppy mills in the U.S. There were also instances unrelated to the investigation where customers purchased puppies that later became sick, even though they were told the animals were healthy.  Best Friends Animal Society and other organizations conducted investigations of Barkworks as well, with the combined efforts leading to a class action lawsuit against the chain. The court case is still ongoing, however, it was agreed that Barkworks would reimburse the customers who purchased sick animals named in the case. Overall, this action will require the chain to be more transparent about the source of their dogs by providing customers with the breeder’s name and location.

https://www.onegreenplanet.org/animalsandnature/undercover-investigations-truth-behind-pet-stores/

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What You Can Do

 

These investigations are telling, but they only represent a sampling of the overall issue. Pet store ordinances banning the sale of commercially bred animals is one way for cities to take a stand against puppy mills, but it’s important for us to do our part as well. All long as people keep buying puppies and kittens from pet stores, the puppy mills will remain in operation and animals will continue to suffer. Help end this cruel industry by choosing to adopt from a shelter or rescue, and only shop for pet supplies at pet stores that work with rescues instead of puppy mills.

https://www.onegreenplanet.org/animalsandnature/undercover-investigations-truth-behind-pet-stores/